The new Middle East > Working Paper

Syria's Uprising: sectarianism, regionalisation, and state order in the Levant

By Steven Heydemann (16/05/2013) Working Paper
Freedom House/Flickr

As the Syrian revolution enters its third year, the risks to regional stability are escalating. Violence has spilled over all of Syria's borders. The conflict has elevated sectarian tensions in Lebanon, threatening the 1990 Taif settlement that ended 15 years of civil war. It has sharpened ethnic and sectarian frictions in Iraq and engulfed southern Turkey. It has heightened tensions across the Syrian-Israeli border. Violence has also spilled into Syria from across the region. Regional involvement in the conflict is deepening. Syrian refugees, now numbering more than a million, are straining the economies and the social fabric of receiving countries. This paper addresses the implications of the regionalisation of Syria’s conflict and the challenges it presents to the stability of the post-Ottoman state order in the Levant.

Download the full version of this publication, available in:
English (430 kB)
Spanish (445 kB)

In this website we use first and third-party cookies in order to improve our services.

In continuing to browse this website, we take it that you consent to our use of said cookies.
Click here for further information on our Cookies Policy.

Accept